Letter W

 

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Witch wraith watches weeping women waging war with wriggly worms

Initial brainstorm sketches

 

Letter associations

w Wax, wax crayon, watercolour, woodcut, wallpaper, water soluble, whiting, wire Wabi sabi Warp, wedge, weight Wheat, White, Wisteria, washi, watercolour, wax paper, wove paper, wrapping paper, wall paper Winged werewolves wage water war on woeful wraiths

First digital mockup

W

Woodcut willow women

Wire witch

Wool worms

Water wraiths

W_composite2

Research

Fonts

Woodcut font

 

Woodcut font 2
Woodcut alpha
Woodcut sans

History of the letter

Medieval writing

Wikipedia article

The letter w is a phoneme from German languages that does not occur in Latin and so is not part of the ancient Latin alphabet.

In old English the /w/sound was usually represented by the runic 〈Ƿ〉 wynn. Gothic  used a letter based on the Greek Υ for the same sound.

In the 7th or 8th century the earliest writers of Old English and Old High German started to write the phoneme as 〈VV〉 or 〈uu〉 (〈u〉 and 〈v〉 becoming distinct only by the Early Modern period). It is from this 〈uu〉 digraph that the modern name “double U” derives. The digraph was commonly used in the spelling of Old High German, but only sporadically in Old English.

Following the Norman Conquest, 〈uu〉 gained popularity in early Middle English.  It was probably considered a separate letter by the 14th century in both Middle English and Middle German orthography,

Scribal realization of the digraph could look like a pair of Vs whose branches crossed in the middle. An obsolete, cursive form found in the nineteenth century in both English and German was in the form of an 〈n〉 whose rightmost branch curved around as in a cursive 〈v〉.

The shift from the digraph 〈VV〉 to the distinct ligature 〈W〉 is thus gradual, and is only apparent in abecedaria, explicit listings of all individual letters, although it remained an outsider not really considered part of the Latin alphabet proper.

English uses 〈w〉 to represent /w/. There are also a number of words beginning with a written 〈w〉 that is silent in most dialects before a (pronounced) 〈r〉, remaining from usage in Old English in which the 〈w〉 was pronounced:wreak, wrap, wreck, wrench, wroth, wrinkle, etc. Certain dialects of Scottish English still distinguish this digraph.

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To edit from previous post

Mockup

W_mockup

Letter associations

w Wax, wax crayon, watercolour, woodcut, wallpaper, water soluble, whiting, wire Wabi sabi Warp, wedge, weight Wheat, White, Wisteria, washi, watercolour, wax paper, wove paper, wrapping paper, wall paper Winged werewolves wageing war with woeful wraiths waft wastewater waves windwards

Research

Letter W in different Typefaces shipped with Adobe.

There are no Typekit fonts that start with W.

Fonts

Free fonts that start with W

Woodcut font
Woodcut font 2
Woodcut alpha
Woodcut sans

History of the letter

Medieval writing

Wikipedia article

The letter w is a phoneme from German languages that does not occur in Latin and so is not part of the ancient Latin alphabet.

In old English the /w/sound was usually represented by the runic 〈Ƿ〉 wynn. Gothic  used a letter based on the Greek Υ for the same sound.

In the 7th or 8th century the earliest writers of Old English and Old High German started to write the phoneme as 〈VV〉 or 〈uu〉 (〈u〉 and 〈v〉 becoming distinct only by the Early Modern period). It is from this 〈uu〉 digraph that the modern name “double U” derives. The digraph was commonly used in the spelling of Old High German, but only sporadically in Old English.

Following the Norman Conquest, 〈uu〉 gained popularity in early Middle English.  It was probably considered a separate letter by the 14th century in both Middle English and Middle German orthography,

Scribal realization of the digraph could look like a pair of Vs whose branches crossed in the middle. An obsolete, cursive form found in the nineteenth century in both English and German was in the form of an 〈n〉 whose rightmost branch curved around as in a cursive 〈v〉.

The shift from the digraph 〈VV〉 to the distinct ligature 〈W〉 is thus gradual, and is only apparent in abecedaria, explicit listings of all individual letters, although it remained an outsider not really considered part of the Latin alphabet proper.

English uses 〈w〉 to represent /w/. There are also a number of words beginning with a written 〈w〉 that is silent in most dialects before a (pronounced) 〈r〉, remaining from usage in Old English in which the 〈w〉 was pronounced:wreak, wrap, wreck, wrench, wroth, wrinkle, etc. Certain dialects of Scottish English still distinguish this digraph.

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